Vocal Democracy - the Art of Singing Together

We recently had the privilege of leading a guest lecture at the Royal Central School of Speech and Drama, working with a very talented and energetic group of BA students. The group, made up of second year students studying DATE (Drama and Theatre Education), explored some of the central issues found in our community singing work, notably the different ways and means that the singing voice can unite a group of people. 

 The group at play, exploring how singing connects and unites us 

The group at play, exploring how singing connects and unites us 

Participant Kirsty wrote about her experience of our workshop on her blog Two Lasses in London.

Moving your body to the music, living in a world of your own yet still feeling like you’re part of the team is key when trying to create a sense of ensemble whether you’re working with professional actors or reluctant amateurs. It is imperative in making theatre smooth, rich and of a high quality. But it’s also just so important to feel that connection together in an ensemble. It’s a fun, indescribable – dare I call it a community, however temporary. And that proved Starling Arts’ point – everyone can sing, and everyone can enjoy it.

Read her full post here